Winning with People

By John C. Maxwell

6,335 ratings - 4.27* vote

Ask the successful CEOs of major corporations, entrepreneurs, top salespeople, and pastors what characteristic is most needed for success in leadership positions, and they'll tell you-it's the ability to work with people. Some people are born with great relationship skills, but those who are not can learn to improve them. In Winning with People Maxwell has translated decades of experience into 25 People Principles that anyone can learn. Maxwell has divided the People Principles in this book

Ask the successful CEOs of major corporations, entrepreneurs, top salespeople, and pastors what characteristic is most needed for success in leadership positions, and they'll tell you-it's the ability to work with people.

Some people are born with great relationship skills, but those who are not can learn to improve them. In Winning with People Maxwell has translated decades of experience into 25 People Principles that anyone can learn.

Maxwell has divided the People Principles in this book according to the questions we must ask ourselves if we want to win with people:

Readiness: Are we prepared for relationships? Connection: Are we willing to focus on others? Trust: Can we build mutual trust? Investment: Are we willing to invest in others? Synergy: Can we create a win-win relationship?

Each section contains guiding People Principles. Some are intuitive, such as The Lens Principle: Who We Are Determines How We See Others. Others may go against your instincts, such as The Confrontation Principle: Caring for People Should Precede Confronting People. All of them are 100 percent practical!

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Book details

Paperback, 0 pages
Published June 30th 2006 by Nelson (Thomas) Publishers,U.S.

(first published 2005)

Original Title
Winning with People
ISBN
078527636X (ISBN13:9780785276364)

Community Reviews

Melanie

Great book if you are a married American male with kids.
“A successful man is one who makes more money than his wife can spend; a successful woman is one who can find such a man.” This quote comes from the section of the book in which the author demonstrates that men and women are different.

My manager recommended this book to me so I diligently read it. Examples are either based on American baseball facts, American history, husband / father situations. Through the book, there is only a handful of examples portraying women: female students in need of a man to be their better self, a famous actress living a life of addiction and sadness. The mention of the female Filipino president is about how she appreciates the author and his mentorship. The only portrayed female who is successful on her own and doesn’t serve a purpose in connection with the author is a high school teacher. Probably the only roles female are authorized to succeed in on their own in our society?
Surely the topics covered are interesting but I wished my male manager had heard of a more relatable source of inspiration for me.

Scott

Former pastor turned leadership guru, John C. Maxwell is known for his insight and experience when it comes to the business industry. What I find helpful is Maxwell’s teachings are applicable to other environments such as church, small groups, and relationships. His 2004 release Winning With People specifically deals with relationships. Quite frequently the mindset of the business world is “What can I do to get ahead?” or “How can I succeed?” Maxwell challenges the reader to think outside of the box and change his or her thoughts to “How can I help others succeed?” (Read my entire review at: http://scottcouey.com/2012/05/21/maxw...)

JD' D'Souza

I like John Maxwell, but if your going to read a book on winning people, read dale Carnegies How To Win Friends And Influence People. If you already read the book and are tempted to read Maxwells book next... don't. Instead reread Dale Carnegie.

Nick

There was a lot of good wisdom in this book. There were also many examples and memorable illustrations. I find John Maxwell's books easy to remember. He puts his lessons in easy to process ways. Some people don't like that, but I think it's helpful.

Ricky

I wasn't surprised when the author revealed that he is a devout Christian - the takeaway from this short book is that if you will win with people if you are a good, honest, and generous person. That's a better message than the list of psychological tricks I anticipated, but I can't say I really learned anything new. The non-stop anecdotes felt a bit formulaic, and some didn't make sense to me: A man slipped another (less fortunate) dad $20 to help buy circus tickets. So we should give others money in order to "Win" with them and make them like us? Not sure.

Christopher

One word, GAY.

This might be good for the touchy feel sensitive person but for me I could not stand to read this. It mentions different strategies on how to deal with people and some principles behind it, but the entire time I kept saying to myself "TELL THESE PEOPLE TO STOP BEING SUCH WHINEY BRATS"

I'll take my advice from Jim Collins where he says that if you hired properly in the first place, then you eliminate most of your people problems in the future.

Mckinley

Very gentle approach to friendly, kind ways to interact with others. Discusses 5 central concerns: readiness, connection, trust, investment and synergy. Lots of examples and questions bring points home.

Readiness - who we are determines how we see others, know yourself first, hurting people hurt people, never hammer someone, we can lift up or take people down

Connection - entire world, except 1, is composed of others; put ourselves in our place not others; each person has potential to teach us something; people are interested in others who are interested in them; believing the best of others usually brings out the best of people; caring precedes confronting others

Trust - foundation of any relationship; never let situation mean more than relationship; when bob has a problem with everyone, bob is usually the problem; being at ease with self helps other be at ease with us; when preparing for battle, dig a hole big enough for a friend

Investment - all relationships need cultivation; find 1% we agree on and focus 100% on it; journey with others is slower than journey alone; celebrate success of friends; take higher road when interacting with others

Synergy - when we help others, we help ourselves; people work well with others they like; working together increases odds of winning together; joy of being together as bottomline

Paula

I've read other books by Maxwell. There was a man in my church who suggested I read a book by John Maxwell. I trusted his opinion so I did. Then I decide to read another. I read another and when this 'unofficial spiritual mentor' of mine asked me what I thought, I was afraid to say anything. Turns out he even believed "if you've read one John Maxwell book, you've pretty much read them all." Epigraphs in the little book on teamwork include quotes by himself. (that was a turn-off) Other books, I can't even remember the titles unless I look them up by author name.

I know he's popular and is considered a leadership guru. He does offer a great deal of sound advice from years of experience as a pastor and leader. He mentions having been mentored himself. I believe he is a man integrity. He's even funny at times. However, I won't spend more time reading another leadership book by him.

Miguel

Poor. I couldn’t finish it. I thought I had bought a book from Maxwell, not a compilation of quotes from other authors.

iänỳ

Great book! I learned quite a deal from it. He touches on some important and useful life lessons in terms of relationships and daily interactions. Read it if you don't easily take to people (generally speaking) or often find yourself in negative dysfunctional relationships. And read it even if neither one of those applies.

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