On the Republic / On the Laws

By Marcus Tullius Cicero, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Marcus Tullius Cicero

3.91 - ratings 2,228

Cicero (Marcus Tullius, 106-43 BCE), Roman lawyer, orator, politician and philosopher, of whom we know more than of any other Roman, lived through the stirring era which saw the rise, dictatorship, and death of Julius Caesar in a tottering republic. In his political speeches especially and in his correspondence we see the excitement, tension and intrigue of politics and th Cicero (Marcus Tullius, 106-43 BCE), Roman lawyer,...

Book details

January 1st 1928 by Harvard University Press

(first published -51)

Edition Language
English

Quotes From "On the Republic / On the Laws"

"True law is right reason in agreement with nature; it is of universal application, unchanging and everlasting; it summons to duty by its commands, and averts from wrongdoing by its prohibitions."
"In a republic this rule ought to be observed: that the majority should not have the predominant power."
"The good life is impossible without a good state; and there is no greater blessing than a well-ordered state."
"In communities and individuals alike, excessive freedom topples over into excessive slavery. Extreme freedom produces a tyrant, along with the extremely harsh and evil slavery that goes with him."
"Justice looks for no prize and no price; it is sought for itself, and is at once the cause and meaning of all the virtues. . . . The worst kind of injustice is to look for profit from injustice."
"The aim of a ship's captain is a successful voyage; a doctor's, health; a general's, victory. So the aim of our ideal statesman is the citizens' happy life--that is, a life secure in wealth, rich in resources, abundant in renown, and honorable in its moral character. That is the task which I wish him to accomplish--the greatest and best that any man can have."
"We are born for justice, and . . . what is just is based, not on opinion, but on nature."
"There is no doubt that a person who is called generous and open-handed has duty in mind, not gain. So likewise justice looks for no prize and no price; it is sought for itself, and is at once the cause and meaning of all the virtues."

Community Reviews

No Reviews

Advertisement

Advertisement

Topics

Advertisement