Nature

By Ralph Waldo Emerson

3.82 - ratings 4,196

Together in one volume, Ralph Waldo Emerson's Nature and Henry David Thoreau's Walking, writing that defines our distinctly American relationship to nature. Together in one volume, Ralph Waldo Emerson's Nature and Henry David Thoreau's Walking, writing that defines our distinctly American relationship to nature.

Book details

Edition Language
English

Quotes From "Nature"

"The happiest man is he who learns from nature the lesson of worship"
"Every spirit builds itself a house; and beyond its house a world; and beyond its world, a heaven. Know then, that the world exists for you. For you is the phenomenon perfect. What we are, that only can we see. All that Adam had, all that Caesar could, you have and can do. Adam called his house, heaven and earth; Caesar called his house, Rome; you perhaps call yours, a cobler's trade; a hundred acres of ploughed land; or a scholar's garret. Yet line for line and point for point, your dominion is as great as theirs, though without fine names. Build, therefore, your own world."
"The health of the eye seems to demand a horizon. We are never tired, so long as we can see far enough."
"But if a man would be alone, let him look at the stars. The rays that come from those heavenly worlds, will separate between him and vulgar things."
"Words are finite organs of the infinite mind."
"Build therefore your own world."
"The world is emblematic. Parts of speech are metaphors, because the whole of nature is a metaphor of the human mind."
"The sun shines today also."

Community Reviews

No Reviews

Advertisement

Advertisement

Topics

Advertisement