Home to War: A History of the Vietnam Veterans' Movement

By Gerald Nicosia, Anthony Swofford

25 ratings - 4* vote

As a new generation comes of age, Home to War presents a vivid portrait of American soldiers who faced rejection by the nation in whose name they fought, and virtual abandonment by the government that sent them to risk their lives. In spite of formidable obstacles, these young Vietnam veterans joined together and committed themselves to heroic battles on the home front, fr As a new generation comes of age, Home to War presents a vivid portrait of American soldiers who faced rejection by the

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Book details

Paperback, 688 pages
August 9th 2004 by Basic Books

(first published April 24th 2001)

Original Title
Home to War: A History of the Vietnam Veterans' Movement
ISBN
0786714034 (ISBN13: 9780786714032)
Edition Language
English

Community Reviews

Christopher Saunders

This phenomenal work chronicles the plight of servicemen and women who returned home from Vietnam to find an indifferent public, hostile government and sensationalist media with no interest in helping them - least of all if they expressed dissenting opinions. Indeed, Nicosia focuses mainly on those who joined groups like Vietnam Veterans Against the War, channeling their rage against government deception and a pointless conflict into activism which helped mainstream the antiwar movement. Nicosia's account of the varied personalities of VVAW and allied groups (including well-known names like John Kerry, Max Cleland and Ron Kovic), their alliances and fallings-out with other veteran and antiwar organizations, along with constant harassment from the Nixon Administration, would alone be worth the time invested. But Nicosia shows the activists battling for rights and recognition through the '70s and '80s, especially the battle over Agent Orange. In a useful counternarrative to our canned understanding of Vietnam, Nicosia shows servicemen among the most active peaceniks, conservatives (especially Ronald Reagan, who drastically slashed the VA's budget, closed veteran's centers and prosecuted activists) the most heartless in their treatment of veterans, showing that their struggles for basic rights and dignity never ended. And that it wasn't apocryphal expectorating hippies, but the American public and feckless politicians who let them down. Sadly, little has changed for our current generation of vets and soldiers; it's much easier to use them as props than acknowledge their humanity.

Brit Reed

I just began reading it the other day, I have to say that previous to reading this, it was hard for me to look at soldiers and kids in their ROTC uniforms and not give them the stink-eye. I still am brashly against wars of any kind, but I'm now able to feel a bit compassionate towards them. I'm also highly interested in working with the IVAW now too.

Pam Escarcega

Exhaustive look at the amazing work for peace & justice born from the veteran's movement. He does their service justice.

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