The Meaning of Disgust: Life, Death, and Revulsion

By Colin McGinn

16 ratings - 2.94* vote

Disgust has a strong claim to be a distinctively human emotion. But what is it to be disgusting? What unifies the class of disgusting things? Colin McGinn sets out to analyze the content of disgust, arguing that life and death are implicit in its meaning. Disgust is a kind of philosophical emotion, reflecting the human attitude to the biological world. Yet it is an emotion Disgust has a strong claim to be a distinctively human emotion. But what is it to be disgusting? What unifies the class

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Book details

Hardcover, 248 pages
November 17th 2011 by Oxford University Press, USA

(first published October 20th 2011)

ISBN
0199829535 (ISBN13: 9780199829538)
Edition Language
English

Community Reviews

Matt Durkin

Occasionally interesting but mostly irresponsible scholarship. Aims for an essentialist critique of disgust while ignoring socio-cultural notions of what constitutes as disgusting. Also very repetitive and continuously states that all that what he argues may be wrong. To be blunt: this is one of the dumbest books I've read.

sinclair

it ignores some pretty obvious western bias, which is disappointing because a document on the philosophy and implication of disgust was fascinating to read as a disgust-prone person due to my OCD. the topic was compelling and the faults were disappointing.

Erica

makes his point within like, the first 50 pages. after that, pretty repetitive and boring.

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