Quotes by Robert R. McCammon

"You know, I do believe in magic. I was born and raised in a magic time, in a magic town, among magicians. Oh, most everybody else didn’t realize we lived in that web of magic, connected by silver filaments of chance and circumstance. But I knew it all along. When I was twelve years old, the world was my magic lantern, and by its green spirit glow I saw the past, the present and into the future. You probably did too; you just don’t recall it. See, this is my opinion: we all start out knowing magic. We are born with whirlwinds, forest fires, and comets inside us. We are born able to sing to birds and read the clouds and see our destiny in grains of sand. But then we get the magic educated right out of our souls. We get it churched out, spanked out, washed out, and combed out. We get put on the straight and narrow and told to be responsible. Told to act our age. Told to grow up, for God’s sake. And you know why we were told that? Because the people doing the telling were afraid of our wildness and youth, and because the magic we knew made them ashamed and sad of what they’d allowed to wither in themselves.

After you go so far away from it, though, you can’t really get it back. You can have seconds of it. Just seconds of knowing and remembering. When people get weepy at movies, it’s because in that dark theater the golden pool of magic is touched, just briefly. Then they come out into the hard sun of logic and reason again and it dries up, and they’re left feeling a little heartsad and not knowing why. When a song stirs a memory, when motes of dust turning in a shaft of light takes your attention from the world, when you listen to a train passing on a track at night in the distance and wonder where it might be going, you step beyond who you are and where you are. For the briefest of instants, you have stepped into the magic realm.

That’s what I believe.

The truth of life is that every year we get farther away from the essence that is born within us. We get shouldered with burdens, some of them good, some of them not so good. Things happen to us. Loved ones die. People get in wrecks and get crippled. People lose their way, for one reason or another. It’s not hard to do, in this world of crazy mazes. Life itself does its best to take that memory of magic away from us. You don’t know it’s happening until one day you feel you’ve lost something but you’re not sure what it is. It’s like smiling at a pretty girl and she calls you “sir.” It just happens.

These memories of who I was and where I lived are important to me. They make up a large part of who I’m going to be when my journey winds down. I need the memory of magic if I am ever going to conjure magic again. I need to know and remember, and I want to tell you."
589 likes

"After years of having a dog, you know him. You know the meaning of his snuffs and grunts and barks. Every twitch of the ears is a question or statement, every wag of the tail is an exclamation."
267 likes

"The truth of life is that every year we get farther away from the essence that is born within us. We get shouldered with burdens, some of them good, some of them not so good. Things happen to us. Loved ones die. People get in wrecks and get crippled. People lose their way, for one reason or another. It's not hard to do, in this world of crazy mazes. Life itself does its best to take that memory of magic away from us. You don't know its happening until one day you feel you've lost something but you're not sure what it is. It's like smiling at a pretty girl and she calls you 'sir'. It just happens."
150 likes

"Maybe crazy is what they call anybody who's got magic in them after they're no longer a child."
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"See, this is my opinion: we all start out knowing magic. We are born with whirlwinds, forest fires, and comets inside us. We are born able to sing to birds and read the clouds and see our destiny in grains of sand. But then we get the magic educated right out of our souls. We get it churched out, spanked out, washed out, and combed out. We get put on the straight and narrow and told to be responsible. Told to act our age. Told to grow up, for God's sake. And you know why we were told that? Because the people doing the telling were afraid of our wildness and youth, and because the magic we knew made them ashamed and sad of what they'd allowed to wither in themselves."
102 likes

Books by Robert R. McCammon

  • Swan Song
  • 57,823 ratings
  • June 1st 1987 by Pocket Books
  • Boy's Life
  • 27,620 ratings
  • October 18th 2011 by Open Road Media

    (first published August 1st 1991)

  • They Thirst
  • 11,265 ratings
  • June 1991 by Dark Harvest

    (first published January 1st 1981)

  • The Wolf's Hour
  • 10,393 ratings
  • August 15th 1990 by Pocket Books

    (first published January 1st 1989)

  • Mine
  • 10,002 ratings
  • May 1st 1991 by Pocket Books

    (first published 1990)

  • Stinger
  • 7,520 ratings
  • October 18th 2011 by Open Road Media

    (first published April 1st 1988)

  • Gone South
  • 5,971 ratings
  • August 1st 1993 by Pocket Books

    (first published 1992)

  • Blue World
  • 4,968 ratings
  • April 1990 by Pocket Books

    (first published 1989)

Robert R. McCammon
  • Robert R. McCammon

  • Date of birth: July 17, 1952
  • Born: in Birmingham, Alabama, The United States.

  • Description: Robert Rick McCammon was a full-time horror writer for many years. Among his many popular novels were the classics Boy's Life and Swan Song. After taking a hiatus for his family, he returned to writing with an interest in historical fiction.

    The sixth book in his Matthew Corbett historical fiction series, Freedom of the Mask, was published in May 2016.

    His next novel, a standalone book called The Listener, was published in February 2018 by Cemetery Dance.

    His newest novel, Cardinal Black, is the seventh book in the Matthew Corbett series. It is available now from Cemetery Dance.

    McCammon resides in Birmingham, Alabama. He is currently working on the eighth Matthew Corbett novel, The King of Shadows.

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