Quotes by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

"Well-behaved women seldom make history."
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"Some history-making is intentional; much of it is accidental. People make history when they scale a mountain, ignite a bomb, or refuse to move to the back of the bus. But they also make history by keeping diaries, writing letters, or embroidering initials on linen sheets. History is a conversation and sometimes a shouting match between present and past, though often the voices we most want to hear are barely audible. People make history by passing on gossip, saving old records, and by naming rivers, mountains, and children. Some people leave only their bones, though bones too make a history when someone notices."
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"A pioneer is not someone who makes her own soap. She is one who takes up her burdens and walks toward the future."
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"To be happy with a man you must understand him a lot and love him a little. To be happy with a woman you must love her a lot and not try to understand her at all."
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"An androgynous mind was not a male mind. It was a mind attuned to the full range of human experience, including the invisible lives of women."
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Books by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

Laurel Thatcher Ulrich
  • Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

  • Date of birth: July 11, 1938
  • Born: in Sugar City, Idaho, The United States.

  • Description: Laurel Thatcher Ulrich is 300th Anniversary University Professor at Harvard University. She is the author of Good Wives: Image and Reality in the Lives of Women in Early New England, 1650-1750 (1982) and A Midwife's Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812 (1990) which won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1991 and became the basis of a PBS documentary. In The Age of Homespun: Objects and Stories in the Making of an American Myth (2001), she has incorporated museum-based research as well as more traditional archival work. Her most recent book is Well-behaved Women Seldom Make History (2007). Her major fields of interest are early American social history, women's history, and material culture. Professor Ulrich's work is featured on the web at www.dohistory.org and www.randomhouse.com.http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~amciv/fac...

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