Quotes by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

"The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity, and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen."
4,941 likes

"Should you shield the canyons from the windstorms you would never see the true beauty of their carvings."
1,520 likes

"People are like stained-glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is a light from within."
1,392 likes

"The reality is that you will grieve forever. You will not ‘get over’ the loss of a loved one; you will learn to live with it. You will heal and you will rebuild yourself around the loss you have suffered. You will be whole again but you will never be the same. Nor should you be the same nor would you want to."
784 likes

"The opinion which other people have of you is their problem, not yours."
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Books by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

  • Over rouw
  • 2,478 ratings
  • April 24th 2012 by Ambo|Anthos
  • Das Rad des Lebens.
  • 2,233 ratings
  • October 1st 2002 by Droemersche Verlagsanstalt Th. Knaur Nachf., GmbH & Co.
  • On Life After Death
  • 1,939 ratings
  • September 1st 1991 by Celestial Arts

    (first published 1984)

Elisabeth Kübler-Ross
  • Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

  • Date of birth: July 08, 1926
  • Died: August 24, 2004
  • Born: in Zürich, Switzerland.

  • Description: Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, M.D. was a Swiss-born psychiatrist, a pioneer in near-death studies and the author of the groundbreaking book On Death and Dying (1969), where she first discussed what is now known as the Kübler-Ross model. In this work she proposed the now famous Five Stages of Grief as a pattern of adjustment. These five stages of grief are denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. In general, individuals experience most of these stages, though in no defined sequence, after being faced with the reality of their impending death. The five stages have since been adopted by many as applying to the survivors of a loved one’s death, as well.

    She is a 2007 inductee into the National Women’s Hall of Fame. She was the recipient of twenty honorary degrees and by July 1982 had taught, in her estimation, 125,000 students in death and dying courses in colleges, seminaries, medical schools, hospitals, and social-work institutions. In 1970, she delivered the The Ingersoll Lectures on Human Immortality at Harvard University, on the theme, On Death and Dying.

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