Quotes by Brian Selznick

"I address you all tonight for who you truly are: wizards, mermaids, travelers, adventurers, and magicians. You are the true dreamers."
2,394 likes

"Maybe we are all cabinets of wonders."
1,148 likes

"Ben wished the world was organized by the Dewey decimal system. That way you'd be able to find whatever you were looking for."
921 likes

"I like to imagine that the world is one big machine. You know, machines never have any extra parts. They have the exact number and type of parts they need. So I figure if the entire world is a big machine, I have to be here for some reason. And that means you have to be here for some reason, too."
752 likes

"Time can play all sorts of tricks on you. In the blink of an eye, babies appear in carriages, coffins disappear into the ground, wars are won and lost, and children transform, like butterflies, into adults."
225 likes

Books by Brian Selznick

  • Frindle
  • 108,632 ratings
  • February 1st 1998 by Atheneum Books for Young Readers

    (first published September 1st 1996)

  • Wonderstruck
  • 54,388 ratings
  • September 13th 2011 by Scholastic Press
Brian Selznick
  • Brian Selznick

  • Date of birth: July 14, 1966
  • Born: in East Brunswick, New Jersey, The United States.

  • Description: Hello there. My name is Brian Selznick and I’m the author and illustrator of The Invention of Hugo Cabret. I was born in 1966 in New Jersey. I have a sister who is a teacher, a brother who is a brain surgeon, and five nephews and one niece. I studied at The Rhode Island School of Design and after I graduated from college I worked at Eeyore’s Books for Children in New York City. I learned all about children’s books from my boss Steve Geck who is now an editor of children’s books at Greenwillow. While I was at Eeyore’s I also painted the windows for holidays and book events.

    My first book, The Houdini Box, which I both wrote and illustrated, was published in 1991 while I was still working at the bookstore. Since then, I have illustrated many books for children, including Frindle by Andrew Clements, The Doll People by Ann Martin and Laura Godwin, Amelia and Eleanor Go for a Ride by Pam Muñoz Ryan and The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins by Barbara Kerley, which received a 2001 Caldecott Honor.

    I have also written a few other books myself, including The Boy of a Thousand Faces, but The Invention of Hugo Cabret is by far the longest and most involved book I’ve ever worked on.

    I live in Brooklyn, New York, and San Diego, California.

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